The Introduction:

 

This is a research project that will be exploring how the visual data recorded by Lidar technology (3D laser scanning) in cultural preservation projects varies in quality. The artist and writer Hito Steyerl has termed the product of bad quality 3D scanning as ‘2.5D Space’ (as opposed to true 3D space), in her essay 'Ripping Reality: Blind Spots and Wrecked Data in 3D' (Duty Free Art, 2017).

 

The probability for poor quality 3D scanning occurs in proportion to the 3D recorder’s degree of interest. These degrees of interest can be seen within scans made by cultural preservation projects themselves, such as the CyArk Open Heritage Program. I want to use this residency to develop research/work that responds to this variation in quality in scans developed by projects such as CyArk Program. 

 

But first, what is Lidar? Here is a clear and brief YouTube video from Geospatial World that describes how the technology works:

 

2.5D Landscape

 

maxcolson.com

@maxcolson 

The Overview:

 

Below is a jpeg produced from Lidar scan data of Ancient Stabiae, Italy. This scan gives a 'bird's eye' perspective of this heritage site:

This is another jpeg produced from the same data. It’s again from above except this time its slight angle:

And the same site again, except this time it’s in profile. Hopefully you have a sense of the shape of this site now:

The images above were made from scan data of Ancient Stabiae, Italy. This scan was made by the CyArk Open Heritage Program. For those of you unfamiliar with this site, here is some text from the CyArk cultural preservation project:

 

"Ancient Stabiae was established in the first centuries BCE and CE in a panoramic position on the edge of Varano hill. Chosen by the aristocracy and members of the Roman Imperial, Ancient Stabiae was home to luxury villas of the Roman elite. After the eruption of the Vesuvius in 79 CE, the city was buried under fourteen meters of dry lapilli (cinder) as were the nearby sites of Pompeii and Herculaneum. However, unlike Pompeii and Herculaneum, Stabiae rose from the ashes and became famous for the healing properties of its thermal spring water....

 

In June 2013, the non-profit Restoring Ancient Stabiae (RAS) Foundation partnered with CyArk to digitally preserve priority areas of the villas, including Villa Arianna, as part of a larger master plan to define and create Ancient Stabiae as a sustainable archaeological park. To accomplish this, CyArk utilized terrestrial LiDAR scanners in tandem with conventional survey methods to create accurate digital measurements of the villa. In addition to the digital preservation of priority areas at Ancient Stabiae, the RAS Foundation’s master plan calls for new measures to transform the site into a museum-park that will soon provide the best place to study Roman villa culture."

I have been using Lidar technology and working with the scan data for about a year and a half now (to see my other work using Lidar have a look at Offshore London or London Knowledge on my website - the image directly above is from Offshore London, a current project in which I am scanning properties owned by companies based in offshore tax havens).

 

For this particular residency with Sink I am interested in exploring how the gradual decay in the resolution of the architecture and environment within the Lidar scan shows a hierarchy of interest in the information that is recorded.

 

Another way of explaining what I mean is that every Lidar scanner has a radius that it is able to scan within. Objects that are closer to the scanner are scanned in higher resolution. Objects at the periphery do not register so well. Once one gets to the periphery of the scanners’ radius the resolution drops off, so much so that there are mere traces of the original forms. In this way one can see the scan itself as a set of territories, rippling outwards towards resolutions of less and less interest:

In my initial research on this residency I will be dissecting scans such as the one of Ancient Stabiae to look at the different ‘resolutions of interest’. Here is an image I made last week that takes buildings from each territory of the Ancient Stabiae scan, where the decay in the resolution of the architecture can be more easily perceived as you go up the y axis:

I’ll leave it there for now.

 

maxcolson.com

 

@maxcolson

2.5D Landscape

 

maxcolson.com

@maxcolson 

 

 

 

The Introduction:

 

This is a research project that will be exploring how the visual data recorded by Lidar technology (3D laser scanning) in cultural preservation projects varies in quality. The artist and writer Hito Steyerl has termed the product of bad quality 3D scanning as ‘2.5D Space’ (as opposed to true 3D space), in her essay 'Ripping Reality: Blind Spots and Wrecked Data in 3D' (Duty Free Art, 2017).

 

The probability for poor quality 3D scanning occurs in proportion to the 3D recorder’s degree of interest. These degrees of interest can be seen within scans made by cultural preservation projects themselves, such as the CyArk Open Heritage Program. I want to use this residency to develop research/work that responds to this variation in quality in scans developed by projects such as CyArk Program. 

 

But first, what is Lidar? Here is a clear and brief YouTube video from Geospatial World that describes how the technology works:

 

The Overview:

 

Below is a jpeg produced from Lidar scan data of Ancient Stabiae, Italy. This scan gives a 'bird's eye' perspective of this heritage site:

This is another jpeg produced from the same data. It’s again from above except this time its slight angle:

And the same site again, except this time it’s in profile. Hopefully you have a sense of the shape of this site now:

The images above were made from scan data of Ancient Stabiae, Italy. This scan was made by the CyArk Open Heritage Program. For those of you unfamiliar with this site, here is some text from the CyArk cultural preservation project:

 

"Ancient Stabiae was established in the first centuries BCE and CE in a panoramic position on the edge of Varano hill. Chosen by the aristocracy and members of the Roman Imperial, Ancient Stabiae was home to luxury villas of the Roman elite. After the eruption of the Vesuvius in 79 CE, the city was buried under fourteen meters of dry lapilli (cinder) as were the nearby sites of Pompeii and Herculaneum. However, unlike Pompeii and Herculaneum, Stabiae rose from the ashes and became famous for the healing properties of its thermal spring water....

 

In June 2013, the non-profit Restoring Ancient Stabiae (RAS) Foundation partnered with CyArk to digitally preserve priority areas of the villas, including Villa Arianna, as part of a larger master plan to define and create Ancient Stabiae as a sustainable archaeological park. To accomplish this, CyArk utilized terrestrial LiDAR scanners in tandem with conventional survey methods to create accurate digital measurements of the villa. In addition to the digital preservation of priority areas at Ancient Stabiae, the RAS Foundation’s master plan calls for new measures to transform the site into a museum-park that will soon provide the best place to study Roman villa culture."

I have been using Lidar technology and working with the scan data for about a year and a half now (to see my other work using Lidar have a look at Offshore London or London Knowledge on my website - the image directly above is from Offshore London, a current project in which I am scanning properties owned by companies based in offshore tax havens).

 

For this particular residency with Sink I am interested in exploring how the gradual decay in the resolution of the architecture and environment within the Lidar scan shows a hierarchy of interest in the information that is recorded.

 

Another way of explaining what I mean is that every Lidar scanner has a radius that it is able to scan within. Objects that are closer to the scanner are scanned in higher resolution. Objects at the periphery do not register so well. Once one gets to the periphery of the scanners’ radius the resolution drops off, so much so that there are mere traces of the original forms. In this way one can see the scan itself as a set of territories, rippling outwards towards resolutions of less and less interest:

In my initial research on this residency I will be dissecting scans such as the one of Ancient Stabiae to look at the different ‘resolutions of interest’. Here is an image I made last week that takes buildings from each territory of the Ancient Stabiae scan, where the decay in the resolution of the architecture can be more easily perceived as you go up the y axis:

I’ll leave it there for now.

 

maxcolson.com

 

@maxcolson

← SINK.SEXY